A Fun Mandela Effect Test

This week, I discovered a quirky, fun test related to the Mandela Effect. It’s created by AlternateMemories.com.

The test is: Take the Mandela Effect Test.

A Fun Mandela Effect TestI took the test and my results were around 50%. I’ll attribute at least half of that score to normal mistakes.

  • Several questions were related to movies I’d never seen but knew about from ads. So, my guesses were more from pop culture than memory.
  • Some were about topics I’d studied casually, but didn’t remember clearly. Again, I was guessing.
  • Less than half of my answers were things I was certain about. Did I get them right, in this reality…? I haven’t a clue. (I didn’t double-check. As is often the case, this week is particularly busy.)

Nevertheless, I think the quiz is great fun.  I wouldn’t take the results very seriously.

In my opinion, it’s more of a great conversation starter.

After taking the test, I contacted someone at AlternateMemories.com. My questions were more rushed than tactful, as I asked him about the intent of his site.

(In the past, I’ve linked hastily to commercial sites, podcasts, and videos… and then been chagrined to discover their agendas and motivations weren’t aligned with my beliefs or what I’m doing.)

Today, the replies I received from someone at AlternateMemories.com were straightforward and more than a little witty. Frankly, I like that kind of dialogue.

Being immersed in this topic for nearly 10 years – and perhaps with tunnel vision, at this point – I’m delighted when others see fresh, new ways to explore the Mandela Effect.

So, I recommend taking the test for a few chuckles, and perhaps some “Hmm… what is the correct answer, in this reality…?” explorations.

And, as I said, I think it’s great conversation fodder.

But don’t hit the panic button if your test score shows you’re nearly 100% impacted by the Mandela Effect.

Instead, it might reflect how much you’ve tuned into pop culture, which can play fast-and-loose with facts, and deliberately misquote (or downright misrepresent) events and media, to avoid potential trademark liabilities.

Click here to take the test, yourself.

Visual Cues and the Mandela Effect

Illustration courtesy of JD Hancock

This week, MandelaEffect.com visitor Mike H. shared a couple of video links with me. (I rarely have time for YouTube, even for topics that interest me.)

I’ve posted those videos, below.  Because this is a busy week, I haven’t watched either video, in full, but – skimming the second one – I realized something that’s important. Well, it’s important to me, anyway, as it’s part of how I remember things, and how I clarify those memories.

I’m a visual learner. Things that I see reinforce memories, and they can trigger memories, as well.

To find out more about learning modalities, here are a few helpful links: Learning Modalities, at Education.comModalities, at the State University of New York, CortlandThe Four Modalities of Learning, at Ms. Dillard’s Classroom.

Every day, I receive many emails and comments related to alternate memories (and an alternate past). On average, I recall about 20% of the memories I read in those emails & comments. I think most people agree with some — but not all — alternate memories they read about at this website and others that explore the Mandela Effect.

Sometimes, I’m not sure about a particular memory. It may be a dual memory, but, at other times, it’s something that wasn’t important to me (when I first learned about it), so I don’t want to claim I’m certain of the alternate memory.

For me, one of those ambivalent memories was the Star Wars’ movie line, “Luke, I am your father,” as opposed to “No. I am your father.” (The movie seems to have the latter line, not the former. However, with several different edits of the original Star Wars movies in circulation, those movies aren’t the strongest evidence to support Mandela Effect theories.)

I was fairly certain I recalled the line as “Luke…,” but — though I’m a fan of Star Wars — I can’t claim that one line made enough of an impact for me to be confident of my alternate memory.

Then, I saw the visual in the second video, below.  It triggered vivid and detailed memories of seeing Star Wars for the first time… and the second time, the third, and so on.

Right away, I understood why — in my reality, at the time — that line definitely started with “Luke…”

It’s because, at times of stress and urgency, when a parent wants to impress his (or her) child with an important fact or order, that parent almost always starts the sentence with the child’s name.

Had Darth Vader said “No. I am your father,” I would have thought he was lying, trying to throw Luke off-guard. I’d have expected the lie to be exposed in the sequel to that film.

That’s my kind of logic. But, until I saw Darth Vader facing Luke in the video, below, I wasn’t 100% certain that my original memory was different from what’s current in this reality.

So, I’m sharing these videos in case they’re helpful to others. I’d like not to launch another “Heinz 57 varieties” series of comments on the individual topics, but I’m interested in hearing from people who find visual cues helpful in clarifying alternate memories.

I’d also like to know how you decide whether something is an alternate memory for you. That is, do you look it up, online? Or, do you go back to an old book, movie, or journal? Do you check with friends or family who might have the same memory?

What’s your process when you encounter a memory that doesn’t fit the current reality?

Mother Teresa – A Saint Once Again?

photo courtesy of India7 Network

Mother Teresa of Calcutta (1910 – 1997) will be canonized as a saint on September 4th, 2016.

From comments and email, it’s clear that many Mandela Effect readers recall Mother Teresa (also remembered as Mother Theresa) being declared a saint prior to 2016.

  • Some recall her being named a saint in the 1990s.
  • Some are sure she was given sainthood while alive.
  • Some specifically reference Pope John Paul II as the pope who approved the canonization.

It’s important to note some landmark recognitions during Mother Teresa’s life and in the years since her death.

  • In 1962, she was given the Philippines-based Ramon Magsaysay Award for International Understanding.
  • In 1969, she was featured in the film, Something Beautiful for God.
  • In 1971, Paul VI awarded her the first Pope John XXIII Peace Prize.
  • In 1979, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
  • In 1980, she received India’s highest civilian award, the Bharat Ratna.
  • After her 1997 death, Pope John Paul II waived the usual five-year wait and began the beatification process.
  • In 2002, the Vatican recognized the first of two required miracles leading to Mother Teresa’s canonization.
  • In 2003, she was officially beatified.
  • In 2015, the Vatican recognized the second of the two required miracles.
  • According to the Vatican, her canonization will take place September 4th, 2016.

If you recall a reality in which she was named a saint (canonized) earlier than 2016, I hope you’ll share those memories in comments,* below.

I’m particularly interested in the context of your memories. That is, where you were, which spelling (Teresa or Theresa) you recall, whether you read about her sainthood in a book, heard about it in class, learned about it from a news report or online, and so on.

*On most articles at this site, comments remain open for just a few days. That’s because the volume of comments can be massive, and sometimes repetitive. (And then there are the trolls & spammers, of course. * sigh * )

DiCaprio Wins… Again?

Several people say they recall the Oscar ceremony where Leonardo DiCaprio won the Best Actor award. They recall a similar acceptance speech, as well. However, they recall it happening in the past.

DiCaprio oscar?
Oscar photo courtesy Davidlohr Bueso

(And no, they’re not confusing it with the BAFTA ceremony in February. Some of them mentioned the BAFTAs, specifically, as a ceremony they’d ruled out as a mix-up.)

I didn’t watch either 2016 ceremony, so I don’t have this memory and I’m not sure how widespread it is as a Mandela Effect.

If you have this memory from the Oscars, tell us when you remember DiCaprio winning, and anything else that makes it a credible, alternate memory matching an “earlier” 2016 Oscar Awards.

I’m especially wondering whether we’ll see a coincidence of memory dates. If so — and yes, this is speculation verging on the fantastical — it could identify a reality where time is tracking ahead of us by a specific amount.

Update: I’m receiving reports with clear memories of DiCaprio winning the Best Actor award for Titanic, including 1998 talk shows replaying his acceptance speech. If you have this memory, or recall DiCaprio winning for any other movie, prior to 2016, let me know.

Different Strokes or Diff’rent Strokes?

Diffrent strokesThanks to Mike H. for bringing this to my attention: the change between the TV series “Different Strokes” and “Diff’rent Strokes.”

Until Mike mentioned it, I thought it was Different Strokes. However, I never watched the TV series, so I can’t state – with confidence – that the show name has changed.  Maybe I wasn’t paying close attention to the name when someone referenced it.

Also, I don’t follow Reddit (not for Mandela Effect topics, anyway), and I don’t usually look at “Mandela Effect” videos at YouTube.com. (I haven’t posted any videos about the Mandela Effect, and I kind of resent it when people want to connect the Mandela Effect phrase with “debunking” videos about Flat Earth Theory or anything else that takes us off-topic.)

So, I was rather pleased when Mike sent me the following video link. I don’t share all of timberwolves100’s memories or views, and – at this site – I avoid topics of religion and psy-ops or conspiracies.

(Nevertheless, since the “Lord’s Prayer” topic keeps coming up: everyone is correct about “debts” v. “trespasses.” Both are in the Bible, and it depends on which version you were raised with: Luke’s or Matthew’s. Most were raised with the “debts” version. The only way this topic enters the Mandela Effect is if you know you were raised with Luke’s version, but – in this reality – your family insists you were raised with Matthew’s, or vice versa. So, along with politics and conspiracies, let’s avoid religious topics here, including any Lord’s Prayer discussions.)

However much of timberwolves100’s video is a powerful overview of several topics we’ve discussed here in the past year. And – fast-forwarding to around the 11:30 mark – he sums it up nicely when he says you should find out what’s real for you.

It’s not necessarily media manipulation or psy-ops or anything like that. Don’t let anyone turn this into something that makes you uneasy, resentful, or downright anxious.

In my opinion, the Mandela Effect makes it possible for all of us to be correct in our memories, even when those memories seem to conflict with others’. So, it should put you more at ease, not increase your anxiety.

And, we’re not all traveling together in a pack. Just because you remember “Berenstein Bears” doesn’t mean you must also recall Looney Toons, or Mandela’s 20th century death, or any other alternate memory described as the Mandela Effect.

Trust your memories.

So, did you watch Diff’rent Strokes regularly enough to be sure it was Different Strokes?  I’m interested in how widespread this alternate memory is.

And really, I’m applauding timberwolves100 for making a good, common-sense video. Whether I agree with all viewpoints, I like to see them represented by people with critical thinking skills engaged.

Thanks!

Sinbad as a Genie

Sinbad as a genie?
Photo courtesy Jerry Crawford.

This topic was first raised in August 2015, around the time that the Berenstein/Berenstain topic surged in popularity. So, it may have become lost in the Bears discussions.

David S. was the one who mentioned it. He said, “I’ve noticed weird examples of this for years. E.g. a movie with Sinbad where he plays a genie but the closest thing would be Kazaam with Shaq.”

David S. was correct, in a 2014 Q&A Interviewly.com session, here’s what Sinbad said:

Sinbad, there is a large rumor/conspiracy going around that you played a genie in a movie in the 90’s similar to Shaq in Kazaam. Can you confirm or deny the existence of this supposed film? Thanks for the AMA!

it was SHAQ SHAQ SHAQ
but we all look alike

Several people replied to David’s comment, and I’ve moved their comments to this post, so this discussion can continue, focusing specifically on the Sinbad movie.

[Temporarily, the number of  previous comments are showing up as a count, but not the actual comments, except on my dashboard. I’m hoping to sort this glitch, soon. Several other people remembered this movie, and – along with at least one other person – I found the actual movie listed in a Google search.]

Also, DbD had asked whether or not this Sinbad/Genie movie appeared (and then vanished) around the same time as the Looney Tunes/Toons change. It’s a good question.

Since I saw the movie in search results – and images from the movie, as well – when David S. commented (August 2015), I’m not sure the timing matches. If anyone else has both memories and can give a time frame, that could be useful.

Sinbad looks like a genie. To me, it’s not just the missing movie that’s odd… it’s that, in this reality, no one cast him as a genie, ever. It’s hard to imagine Hollywood not making good use of obvious casting and easy marketing.

Looney Tunes or Looney Toons

Looney Tunes
© Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Recently, after people had raised “Looney Toons” as an alternate memory, something odd happened: People report seeing “Looney Tunes” (the actual name) change to “Looney Toons,” at many websites, just for a day or so.

For example, on 28 Nov 2015, Emily said, “Hey guys…. Looney Tunes changed again. Just last week it was Looney Toons…” (“Last week” would have been Nov 15th – 22nd.)

Ordinarily, I’d dismiss that kind of report as a brief and localized issue – usually a print media error, or a typo in a digital TV show listing.

Tiny Toons
© Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Also, it doesn’t help that Tiny Toons exist, with similar graphics to their “grown-up” counterparts. So, that provides plenty of reason for people to be confused about the cartoon series’ names.

(However, several people – including Lebaneser Scrooge – mentioned Tiny Toons in their comments, so they were aware of the difference.)

In this case, Emily’s comment was one of many. She wasn’t confusing “Tiny Toons” and “Looney Tunes.”  In fact, reports were widespread and credible.

The alternate memory –  a reality in which it really is “Looney Toons” – was suggested in some 2014 emails. By March 2015, people were more outspoken about this. (See a comment on Comments 5 and another on Comments 6, with more on later pages.)

So, if the one-day switch was deliberate, the crossover wasn’t original; we’d already talked about it, here. And – if it was a genuine mistake (by one or more people) – one might question whether those who changed the name, temporarily, may have come from another reality.

But, that’s assuming the brief name change occurred in this reality. And frankly, it’s stacking one speculation atop another, reaching a precarious conclusion.

As I see it, we have several explanations, none of which can be proved. Here they are, in no particular order:

  1. Everyone who thought they saw “Looney Toons” was mistaken. (I don’t believe that, based on the volume of reports I received, but it must be mentioned if we’re considering every possibility.)
  2. Everyone who saw “Looney Toons,” online, had slid into a reality where that was the correct spelling. And then they slid back into this reality, without noticing any other alternate-reality cues.
  3. The veil (or whatever you want to call it) between realities thinned, briefly and only in certain locations, so the alternate reality’s “Looney Toons” name phased into view in (or from) this reality.
  4. The brief change – from Looney Tunes to Looney Toons – was deliberate, and either a prank or a social experiment. (The scale of that would be impressive, but not impossible.)

If you saw Looney Toons in November (or at any other time), share your thoughts in comments. If possible, include when you saw it, and where you were at the time (nearest city).

LOONEY TUNES and all related characters and elements are trademarks of, and copyright by, © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.