That X-Files Episode (Mandela Effect)

X-Files - Mulder & Scully fall victim to the Mandela Effect
HollywoodLife.com story headline

A recent episode of the X-Files (reboot) uses the Mandela Effect as a story element.

I’m astonished. (That’s an understatement.) I never expected the Mandela Effect to attract so much attention.

Really, this still seems kind of surreal.

I haven’t seen the X-Files episode yet, but – from descriptions, such as the one at Hollywood Life – it sounds like a great parody.

(Should I be offended by their portrayal? It sounds zany, not insulting, and really, it’s just fiction and on TV, as well. I may change my opinion after I see the episode, but – for now – I’m chuckling.)

Tesseract - Mandela Effect

UPDATE

I watched the show (Season 11, Episode 4, “The Lost Art of Forehead Sweat”). I’m still chuckling. Yes, they were a little heavy handed with the political references. That was a surprise, since the show was broadcast on Fox. But, I’m aware that Fox and Fox News are independently managed.

But, putting politics firmly to one side (let’s not go there in comments), I was thoroughly pleased with the representation of the Mandela Effect. It was well-explained (well enough) and treated lightly.

To me, the shows seemed stylish and whimsical. I’m delighted. (This was the first time I’d ever watched an X-Files episode all the way through.)

I also loved the question left hanging at the end of that episode, about whether Reggie was a madman, or someone being silenced.

So, I’m pleased. For me, being the topic of an X-Files episode is about as close to a social “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval” as it gets. It moves Mandela Effect discussions further into the mainstream.

The more people talk about it – and weed out what’s true, what’s not, and what’s baffling – the closer we may get to understanding this phenomenon.

Tesseract - Mandela Effect

FREE T-SHIRT DESIGNS

Want to start a conversation about the Mandela Effect? A t-shirt could be useful.

These printable designs are already reversed so – as long as you have some variety of iron-on (transfer) paper – you can print the design, and then iron it onto your own t-shirts. Or whatever you like.

Here are the DIY T-shirt designs, so far (more are on the way):

1.) The Mandela Effect – What a Reality (The single-page graphic includes a white-letter version and a black-letter version. Trim the transfer to fit your needs.) Click here for the transparent GIF featuring both color choices, for personal, DIY use.

Mandela Effect - What a Reality(Trivia: That’s a design I created for my own t-shirt. It’s what I’ve worn for the past year or so. I get nods, and the occasional request to be part of a selfie.)

2.) and 3.) Instant Reality-Shift Translator – Two different iron-on designs. The first has Black letters (to print on light-colored fabric). The second has White letters (to print on black and dark-colored t-shirts).

Instant Reality Shift - Tee Shirt iron-on free

(That t-shirt design does not say “Mandela Effect” on it, on purpose. It’s designed to spark conversations, but Mandela Effect fans will recognize it right away. Not quite a “secret handshake,” but not entirely obvious, either.)

4.) Mandela Effect Universe – This design is a little more difficult to use as a DIY design. (You may want to order the Amazon t-shirt, already made.)

Mandela Effect - Black background graphic for t-shirts

The design is entirely in shades of white and grey. Whatever color shirt you iron it onto… that will be the color of the background and the lettering. (To show the design clearly, I’ve used a black background in the illustration above.) Click here to download the transparent GIF for DIY use.

Yes, to cover the hosting bill for this website, we’d already started creating new Mandela Effect t-shirt designs, mostly for fun, but also for people who don’t want to use the DIY versions. (Some are a little too finicky for DIY designs, too. It’s better to trust the professionals with them.)

Note: Comments on this post were open through early Feb 9th. They are now closed.

Author: Fiona Broome

Author and paranormal researcher, best known for starting Mandela Effect research (2009 - present), and her studies of ghostly phenomena.