Henry VIII Portrait with Turkey Leg

Many people recall a painted portrait of Henry VIII holding a turkey leg in one hand.

It’s among my memories, too. It was a classic painting of Henry VIII, in the Holbein style (at right), but Henry is shown enjoying a hearty meal.  I recall something that looked like a turkey leg in one hand. (I thought it was his left hand — on the right side of the canvas — but I may be wrong.)

I also recall a large, opulent goblet in front of him.  I assumed it was to show that God had blessed the monarch with good health and a comfortable lifestyle.

(Portrait artists sometimes included symbolic objects in portraits.  The Petworth House portrait on the right shows the king holding his gloves in his right hand.  That was a symbol of luxury and refinement, frequently used in his portraits.)

Apparently, the “turkey leg” portrait doesn’t exist. It never did… not in this timestream, anyway.

That’s odd, because so many people seem to recall it.

My memory is so clear, I’ve wondered if Mad magazine or another parody in the media had morphed the image from one of the monarch’s famous portraits.  So far, I can’t seem to find one, but it’s the most rational explanation, if one ignores alternate history possibilities.

Henry Tudor, King of England, lived from 1491  to 1547 and ruled between 1509 and his death.  He was well-known for his banquets, though he may not have been as “well-fed” as his portraits suggest.  Some historians say that he was trim most of his life, but gained weight shortly before his death, when an old leg injury prevented him from being very active.

The turkey question

Some insist that Henry VIII couldn’t have dined on turkey, because the turkey was native to North America, and it wasn’t available in England in Henry VIII’s time.

That’s not true.

During Henry’s time, guinea-fowl were a delicacy in England. They were generally imported through Turkey, so they were sometimes called turkey-fowl, shortened to just “turkeys.”

However, if you look at a photo of guinea fowl, they look like partridges.  In the apparently non-existent portrait, there’s no way Henry VIII was brandishing a guinea fowl’s leg.  It may have been the leg of a peacock, a large chicken, or some other big bird, but not likely a guinea fowl, unless the bird had been bred for unusual size.

The North American turkey was introduced to England by Sir William Strickland, after — as a youth — he’d accompanied Sebastian Cabot (1483 – 1557) on his American voyages. Strickland is attributed with the first known drawing of a North American turkey. It’s in the College of Arms, when Strickland applied for a coat of arms that included the turkey in his family crest.

So, it was possible for King Henry VIII to dine on a well-fed North American turkey.  Without a painting to look at, it’s impossible to decide the best explanation.

(Some people suggest that some portrait might show a rumored, oversized thumb on one of Henry’s hands, not food.  Except for one “Straight Dope” comment, I find no references to a defective thumb or a “Tudor thumb.”  I’m dismissing that as a possibility. If Henry VIII had a thumb so deformed it could be mistaken for a turkey leg, it’d be a popular topic at Tudor-related forums.)

The problem is,  no one can find anything like “turkey leg” portrait, though it seems to be a clear memory for many people.

The turkey leg reference is popular, whether or not the painting exists.  For example, in the 15th season of The Simpsons, the Margical History Tour episode closes with a reference to Henry VIII holding the world turkey-leg eating record.

Some people point to the Charles Laughton portrayal of Henry VIII in a movie.  I’d never seen it, so I’ve posted the clip below. (If you don’t see the Flash clip, it’s also at Turner Classic Movies.)

http://i.cdn.turner.com/v5cache/TCM/cvp/container/mediaroom_embed.swf?context=embed&videoId=214995

Some people seem to think the issue comes from the dining scene, in which actor Charles Laughton devours a chicken with considerable zeal.  (That’s a screenshot on the right.)

Maybe that’s true for some people with this memory, but – even if I’d seen the movie as a small child and later forgot it – what I recall was in color, and it wasn’t funny.

The chicken leg in Laughton’s left hand is a match, as is the large goblet, but that’s where the resemblance stops.

If anything, I’d suspect the Laughton movie scene was inspired by the same portrait I recall.

My memory includes a somewhat serious portrait, probably attributed to Holbein the Younger. It showed Henry VIII, full face, looking at the portrait painter.  Something like a turkey leg was in Henry’s hand, and I recall a goblet as well.  I don’t remember what the table looked like, in front of him.  I’m not sure it was visible, but I don’t remember it not being there, either.

I’m about 90% certain I saw this painting in real life, probably “backstage” at the Boston (MA) Museum of Fine Arts, where my aunt co-supervised the verification of paintings, detecting forgeries.

If you remember a painting like this, or can shed fresh, credible light on why so many people seem to recall it, please leave a comment.

I’m still leaning towards the idea that a parody portrait exists, somewhere, and it’s convincingly like the Holbein portaits.  So far, I can’t seem to find it.

Author: Fiona Broome

Author and paranormal researcher, best known for starting Mandela Effect research (2009 - present), and her studies of ghostly phenomena.

163 thoughts on “Henry VIII Portrait with Turkey Leg”

  1. I asked my cousin who is what I refer to as a forever student (currently he’s studying for idk what but whatever it is its his last thing cuz he already has ALL other diplomas and PhD’s and after that he was told he couldn’t do anything else) about the painting and he said that it was a painting of Caesar. But I have yet to find that painting as well.

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    1. Wrenlet, I have no idea what your cousin is talking about. Henry VIII and Caesar couldn’t possibly be confused for each other. Totally different eras, clothing styles, portrait styles, art materials and techniques… there is no way anyone is going to mix them up.

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  2. I distinctly remember this. Left hand, right side of the picture. It’d be worth searching for “chicken leg” or “pigs leg” or other things before we completely rule out that we haven’t found it since the turkey leg simply wouldn’t make sense and I don’t recall it looking distinctly different from the leg of an animal you’d expect to find in England, I’d have said a chicken’s leg myself.

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    1. Matt, I have run repeated Google image searches using a variety of terms including: king, monarch, royalty, dinner, meal, goblet, leg, etc. I’ve also scoured library books for the image in any bio of King Henry VIII or other monarchs. So far, no joy.

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  3. I have a theory (unresearched, but I plan to do further looking later this evening) that may explain why so many recall seeing this painting in books and even in the “backstage” area of a museum, but not actual on display in a museum. Perhaps this: while we had photographic evidence of the painting for art and history books, we did not have the painting itself, as it was likely part of a private collection. The collector dies, bequething the painting to a museum (perhaps Boston, explaining it’s presence in the “backstage” area). The museum, as museums will do, attempts to authenticate the painting, at which point they realize the painting is a forgery. By forgery, I don’t mean it was necessarily used to defraud; it was, and still is, very common for young artists to practice their craft by copying the styles and themes of known masters. They realize the painting is not a true Holbein and it is removed from use. The images are pulled from art and history books, and no one bothers putting it on the internet because of its perceived lack of value.

    I do really think there is something to the “sliding” thing, as I have my own memories that could be “Mandela Effect” memories. I just thought I’d throw this out there as a possibility. 🙂

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    1. duesergirl, that is a possibility, but — for me, anyway — it seems a bit of a stretch, given the number of people who remember the painting. It would have to have been in a lot of art and history books… none of which I can find, searching (so far) two public library collections.

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  4. I totally remember the painting. In fact, it’s literally why I always thought a “feast” involved turkey. I think the ONLY maybe bleeding of my memory might be from Sleeping Beauty where the king eats the big turkey leg (inspired by the painting?) and the mandolin man gets drunk off the wine in his instrument.

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  5. I remember the painting you are talking about in detail. I seem to recall watching a documentary within the past two years that HAD this painting: Henry is by himself at a dining table. There is a gold goblet, and he is holding the large leg of SOME type of fowl. In the background there is a green drape. He is wearing a reddinsh-brown outfit with white cuffs. It seems like there may have been a bite out of the leg as well? Also I seem to remember a decent sized meal on the table as well.

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  6. Yes, I remember it.. I remember seeing it in a book, this would be the mid 80’s, i was in grade school. I remember what everyone has described. In fact, its a part of my subconscious i sense ive always taken for granted, like the mona lisa. I remember his eyes looking somewhat weak and watery as well

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  7. I remember this painting as well. I clicked on this kind of amused, because I presumed that it was a parody portrait I was remembering, but I remember the turkey leg and the goblet and there was also food on the table and it was in the style described.

    It was definitely in color and definitely a painting, though it could have been a parody or more recent thing. I don’t have any memories of the history of it, or seeing it anywhere “official”, just that it existed

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  8. I’m not sure what to make of all this, this whole alternate timeline “Mandela Effect” thing sounds pretty screwy & delusional to me, but FWIW I *do* remember seeing the Henry VIII portrait with him holding some kind of big bird “drumstick”, whether it was supposed to be a turkey, chicken, goose, or whatever I couldn’t tell you.

    If it was supposed to be some sort of parody I can only say it was a fairly subtle one, but again FWIW as a kid in the 70’s & early 80’s I did read through a fair number of Mad Magazines, as well as paperback books of compilations of articles from earlier Mad Magazines, often from years before My time. (I also read a bit of Cracked, sort of a Mad wana-be) The problem with that is those magazines were in black & white except for the covers. Mad did often have some sort of parody Ad in color on the back cover, in fact it might be the case the “turkey leg” painting is actually from a parody or even real ad somewhere, using a real Holbein painting with that detail added.

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  9. My husband and I both remember this painting. My husband says it was a leg of mutton. I feel more like it was some kind of fowl, a turkey or pheasant feels right. We both remember him dressed in a red robe with ermine trim (the white with black splotches fur), holding the meat (with a bite missing) in his hand which is somewhat angled up in front of him (as if his elbow were resting on a table you can’t see, but I have a feeling it is there). It’s not a straight on view but not profile either, but he’s looking sort of out of the corner of his eye at the painter. It’s large, but not a full length portrait, more like a bust. I also remember a gold goblet with jewels in front of him, my husband isn’t as clear on that part.

    Interesting thing I stumbled on while I was fruitlessly searching for the painting, a quote attributed to Tim McGraw (the country singer): “I love Bill Clinton. I think we should make him king. I’m talking the red robe, the turkey leg – everything”

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  10. Fiona,

    You are absolutely on to something here. This may be one of the first socially-based clues we had that our reality is not the only one. I applaud your investigative fevor! If you haven’t already, check out the Berenst(e)ain debate. I have a sneaking suspicion that you are on team Berenstein. 🙂
    I can’t wait to see where this rabbit hole leads.

    Congratulations,

    Will

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  11. This genuinely disturbs me, and is my personal conclusive proof of the Mandela Effect. I have extremely sharp, clear, and recent memories of a Holbien style portrait of Henry VIII eating a turkey leg. People, the portrait no longer exists, I cannot find it anywhere, even in the darkest and furthest corners of the internet.

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    1. Alex,

      I’m absolutely certain it existed. Seeing that magnificent painting in real life was (at least partly) responsible for my lifelong fascination with Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and Shakespeare. Visiting “backstage” at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (MA, USA), I saw many wonderful paintings closer than the public is usually allowed. That’s one of just a few that stand out in my memory. It made that much of an impression.

      However, had the painting been in this timestream, I’m fairly confident we’d see some evidence in a Google Image search or in books about either Henry VIII or Holbein-related fine art.

      I’m still holding onto hope that someone will find proof that it exists, but it may be — for you and me — personal proof of the Mandela Effect, instead.

      Cheerfully,
      Fiona

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      1. Yes, I too am fascinated by the Tudors (specifically Henry VIII) and I could tell you just about everything you’d ever want to know about them. I have taken several history classes and I remember seeing the painting in all of them until about half way through last year, when it just vanished. I thought I was the only one that (purely out of coincidence) had stopped noticing it until yesterday.

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        1. I could however, be a little off on the time frame I stopped seeing it I have an itch that it was midway through 2014, but it could have possibly been midway through 2013.

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  12. I remember as a child, holding a huge turkey leg on Thanksgiving, saying I looked like Henry the 8th! That painting is in my earliest memories, yet it cannot be located anywhere on the net; now my head is spinning!

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  13. I’m so disturbed. I was browsing through the list of memories on this site, saw the one about King Henry VIII and a turkey leg, and immediately thought, “Yeah, I know that painting!”

    Before I read any of these comments discussing details of the painting or the style it was painted in, I could picture it so clearly in my mind’s eye. And it matched with all of these comments once I started reading this. I remember this painting so clearly, and it’s just…nowhere.

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  14. Hello! I came across this page following the Berenstein Bears / Berenstain Bears phenomenon, and while following through some Reddit forums I found this image: http://www.lookandlearn.com/history-images/B002057

    I didn’t read all the comments in your post, but I skimmed and searched quickly to see if it has been posted before — so far, no one has.

    It matches your description — turkey, goblet, opulent table, and a fairly serious depiction that shows how fortunate he is.

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    1. Catalina,

      I appreciate your efforts to be helpful, but I don’t see how that illustration matches the description, except that it’s Henry VIII at a dining table.

      That links shows an illustration from a children’s book, not at all like Holbein. It shows the king among a crowd, not as the solitary focal point. He’s holding a goblet of some kind. And, nothing in that picture looks like a turkey leg… not that I can see, anyway.

      It may be a match for someone else’s memory, so I’m approving this. For me, it’s not even close.

      Sincerely,
      Fiona Broome

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  15. I have been searching, for about a year, for something to disprove my proof of the Mandella Effect: This very painting.
    Let me give you quick background.. my son, age 4, told me that when he was 1 the ‘green light’ was on ‘top of the red light’. That made me laugh.. then a few other events occurred and my personal world was rocked, and figured that my son, saying how the red light changed from his own 1 year old memory, had a time slip. That is how I arrived to the whole Mandella effect to begin with, along with Starfire Tor on Art Bell and callers to his program saying that they believed Mandella died in prison.

    Now back to the subject at hand, or in hand, the turkey leg.
    I recall exactly what others recall.. a painting. An opulent setting. The grand feast in front of Henry, his eyes were heavy and looking somewhat sad. The turkeyish leg in his right hand, so on the left hand side of the painting. And I also vaguely recall somewhat of a window setting behind him, maybe.

    The memories are so much the same as others.
    And get this.. I recall it being discussed in my 4th or 5th grade social studies class, with all of the kids looking at the painting and chuckling. This would have been in the late 1980s…

    So it goes back to the idea that we all saw the same thing, or series of things, which formed a similar image in our minds.
    but why so exact..
    Why so many pop culture references to a painting that does not exist..
    Why does every single person I talk to say they saw this painting?
    And why is it gone?
    Disturbing to say the least.

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  16. Wow this blew my mind when i saw this today, i have spent at least 2 hours looking for the painting i saw when i was a kid in the 70’s im 47 now, i distinctively remember a painting very similar to the one shown at the top of the page, but the king was eating a very large turkey leg i also remeber the wine goblet, i do believe one was in one hand the other was in the other,,, like i said i can see the painting in my head,,, i searched images for over two hours tonight and can not find the painting i saw,,, i found many links to a painting that looks like what i saw , with out the turkey leg or the wine,,, but not the picture i can see in my head right now from when i was a kid. strange stuff man.

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  17. just to add another odd thing to my prior statement, my great aunt also frequented the “Boston (MA) Museum of Fine Arts”, as a matter of fact she dies there in the 80’s as an elderly woman, she fell down the stairs and hit her head…

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    1. Sorry to hear about your great aunt, but what a way (and place) to go, surrounded by wonderful art. (Those stairs can be treacherous, and the stone is certainly hard. I can understand how easy it was for her to fall.)

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  18. I think this is the painting causing the memory so many share. I believe someone mentioned thus before (in part). The right side of Henry the XIII is golden, and looks like a turkey leg. His wife’s midsection looks like a golden goblet. I believe these subliminal images have created lasting impressions on those who have viewed the painting. This may have been a trick created by a the talented painter who was aware of the ability to create such illusions, or it may have simply been by chance. This painting also has the window (doors) in the background that someone mentioned remembering, and the colors people have mentioned are there as well. In my opinion, these subliminal forms in the painting are responsible for creating lasting impressions on so many people. I do like the idea that there was an actual painting that you all recall, and it is now gone. That is much more interesting 🙂

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  19. This came up in my Undergrad Shakespeare Survey, actually! Apparently, the popular painting is actually meant to be Shakespeare’s Falstaff from Merry Wives Of Windsor and got attributed as a Henry VIII painting somewhere along the way? The thing is, I distinctly remember it as Henry too.

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    1. Combeferret, do you have a link to that painting? A Google Image search didn’t turn up anything like the Henry VIII painting we’re talking about. For just a minute, I was hoping we’d have an answer to these questions. Alas, everything I see in the search is Falstaff with a cup or flagon, and usually standing or falling out of a chair, not seated at a table.

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  20. I remember seeing this in history class, and someone made a comment about the giant ‘chicken drumstick’ and the teacher said that it was most likely a Swans leg, as the ruling monarch and their family were the only people in England that were allowed to eat swans (it’s still law now, was never rescinded) and that there is a manmade lake that was created to supply the ruling family with swans for their banquets on the south coast (it’s a reserve now).

    It just seamed so strange to think about eating a swan that the memory has stuck with me all this time.

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  21. I just read the opening of the article and none of the comments, so as to avoid a suggestion.

    The painting you’re referring to is in less quality than an Old Master’s style. The tones were somewhat dark and a bit faded. The paint would likely have had an egg base – it had lost its vibrancy and and hues similar to other egg based paints on paintings from a similar era. The painted surface of the canvas had many small hairline cracks. The painted surface was also largely smooth – it was not a high textured painting. The frame was gilt. The dimensions of the painting were not very large – it was rectangular (taller than wider), though very nearly square.

    The painting showed Henry VIII sitting at a table. He looked directly at the painter. In his right hand was a large meat joint. In front of his left hand is a golden chalice with jewels embedded around it just beneath the lip. I believe they were multi-colored. Henry is wearing a dark red velvet outfit. I believe the collar was while. He is also wearing a hat – some kind of royal hat. The hat is crumpled red velvet as well on the top, but the band around the head had some kind of decoration to it that gave the decided impression that he was a king. Perhaps the hat was a short crown with a velvet insert. His hair was a kind of mix between red and blond. His complexion was fair with a tinge of ruddiness. Henry was stocky and on his way to being fat, but not as fat as later paintings. He looked bold.

    I always remembered this painting as being a bit cheeky. This guy was a notable b*st**d and yet he was perfectly happy to enjoy himself.

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  22. While I admit I am not an art historian I have seen most of the publicly displayed Holbein’s in the UK, I cannot think of a single one depiction of any one eating. It just isn’t part of the genre at the time. I cannot remember seeing this painting ever, but of course I have seen modern takes on medieval kings eating big legs of birds.

    Can you find any paintings of the era where people are eating a large meal or even a bird out of interest? I know you are refusing to believe this painting could have been seen any but Boston, but is there a chance it was in a standard American history text book?

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    1. Michael, you make a very good point and it’s one I’ll need to research.

      A casual search shows many Holbein paintings and sketches that are simple portraits. Some include people sitting or standing near objects that might represent their stations in life, their interests, and so on. None seem to show food.

      Henry may have had some “look at my power and wealth” in his personal style. To his credit, he chose to portray his wealth in terms of food rather than actual gold (ref: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a4/Lais_of_Corinth,_by_Hans_Holbein_the_Younger.jpg ).

      It is odd that no other Holbein-esque paintings seem to show scenes involving food. However, if the king said, “I want to be painted enjoying a hearty meal,” I don’t think anyone would reply, “Sorry, Your Majesty, but I never paint dining scenes.”

      Cheerfully,
      Fiona

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  23. Fascinating ! I was drawn here from ‘The Anomalist’ website, which always leads to interesting things. I had hoped by the bottom of the thread there would be an answer … not yet ! I also recall the exact ornate painting (and not as others have proposed: from a movie, a TV episode, or a ‘conflation’ of different pictures), and must have seen it as a middle school or high school student 35 years ago in a textbook. I’m no art museum fan (yet anyway , although I do recall a TV series where the narrator explained famous paintings (of famous people, families, etc) in great detail, and found it fascinating.
    So the prevailing theories are that it *does* exist but not everything known to mankind is on the Internet, or that’s it’s a Twilight Zone situation brought to life. All other explanations simply can’t explain the consistent agreed description of the memory. As much as I’d like to believe theory #2, I’m going with #1.

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  24. Here is a picture of the exact Henry VIII nutcracker my mother bought me for Christmas in 1999. http://www.ralphart.com/wp-content/gallery/designwork/Nutcrackers_henry8-soldier1999web1000.jpg
    Funny how it some what resembles this alternative Henry painting. Also I remember my father pronouncing the The Berenstain Bears as Berenstein Bears everytime he would read those books to me as a child. Lastly when I heard of Nelson Mandelas death recently I was confused as I have a memory of hearing about him in past tense many years ago as if he had already died.

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  25. Sometimes symbolism is too strong to avoid on grounds of conspiracy or religion.Henry 8th was the catalyst in protestant movement while he himself created a branch of christianity that was not prostestant but rather should be called ‘defiant’,a proper ‘English catholic’.Thanksgiving was one event where the King promoted turkey feasts.Israel being the biggest gobbler of turkey is another symbolism.King’s legacy in 20th century wars from ww1 to first iraq invasion of the last years of the century,hints at time travel spanning 5 centuries.

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  26. I have seen parodies of the henry the viii holding a large “turkey” leg, carry on henry has a little joke about it but that was a peacock.. OK this was a comedy, even my mum says she remembers the leg in the hand. and she doesn’t like those kind of films.. She remembers the painting (she is 80 so mad magazine and the other modern wouldn’t have been read by her) Since she goes to Windsor and other royal residences on tours and special events she said she will have a look. The other thing that gets me is Henry the Eighth was how tall he was.. Most people think is is short, but he was over 6 foot tall, and he was a very athletic person had to be wearing all that armour until he fell from the horse and stopped.

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  27. I also remember the picture of Henry the eighth with the turkey leg, but I remember it in conjunction with Bewitched. I remember either a picture like that or else a scene where he’s eating a turkey leg. Anyone one else remember this?

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  28. I remember in elementary school, seeing a portrait of Henry VIII with what appeared to be a turkey leg on his right hand in a history book sometime in 1997 or 1998.

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  29. I too remember the painting almost exactly like the one displayed. It also rung a bell the story about him not wanting to stop eating and being furious that the painter painted him with the poultry leg. After reviewing the different paintings and media is seems somewhat likely to me that the memory is a conglomeration of different pictures and anecdotes reinforces by the media on a young mind. What is difficult for this theory is that the supposed image is so wide spread.
    For me the Berenstein Bears, Froot Loops and dilemma are even more disturbing. If the Bears had been named -stain I would have associated the word with a stain in your clothes etc. I remember very recently within the last year or so confused by the spelling of Froot Loops at the super market. I always thought it was Fruit loops. I also remember being specifically frustrated with the word dilemma since the advent of spell check because I would always vocalize the n in dilemna to remind myself how to spell it!

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  30. I remember a turkey leg, that he held up in his left hand (my right). Pretty formal painting (obviously), a lot like the style of that Holbein. I think there was a table in front of him, though he wasn’t seated, some sort of cloth drapery on the table, probably laden with things, I don’t remember it too clearly.

    I could have well just merged the two concepts of a painting of Henry and Henry with a turkey leg, or it could have been a parody drawing. Unfortunately I don’t remember that much, and the more I think about it the less I remember.

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    1. Clara, thank you, and you said something that I’m going to be looking for as I analyze the data people have shared at this website. That is, how often people say something like “the more I think about it, the less I remember.”

      That’s odd, but it’s also something I’ve read here, time and again (no pun intended), over the past few years.

      It might be important, because it suggests a thinking process that’s different from what many people experience in the rest of their lives.

      Thanks again!

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      1. Its like me with mandela. but the more i think of the latest death the less real it is, but the more real the 80’s one is… but not vice versa..

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  31. I have a book at home with the picture you guys are talking about. It was a propaganda portrait done by the King of France at the time to discredit Henry as a lazy fatso.

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  32. I came here from the Berenstain link, and was disturbed to see this picture listed on the links. Knowing the thread would likely influence my perception of this painting, I thought carefully before reading the thread: serious expression, red outfit, leg in left hand (right side of picture), at a table. Great, just like what everyone else is saying.
    I believe my memory is from a schoolbook or history book. Whoever compiled it could have used a relatively obscure artist – who knows if the painting was even Henry VIII? But it as certainly *described* as Henry VIII.
    So where is the painting now?
    1. Lost – maybe the image came from the color plates they used to put in art books. A great deal of art was destroyed in the two World Wars.
    2. Obscure – perhaps not a well-known artist and the painting is in mothballs somewhere. And we all know it solely from the history book’s use of it.

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    1. jason, there are some small issues with those two theories:

      1) I’ve seen the painting in real life. It was “backstage” at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (MA, USA). And, while I may be older than many readers at this site, I wasn’t around for WWII. So, unless I saw a really good forgery, the painting survived both world wars.

      2) And, I’ve been through all kinds of art history books at multiple public libraries, and haven’t found anything that looks even remotely like the Henry VIII portrait I recall seeing.

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  33. I’m an artist, I grew up surrounded by paintings, history books and art history books (My mother is an Art Historian and painter) I vividly remember this painting up to the smallest detail. I’ve seen it in a 5th grade history book, in a “Reader’s Digest” article, in a “Muy Interesante” (Mexican Magazine) article and in an art history book (I apologize, I do not remember the editions). Henry is holding the turkey leg in his left hand or right side of the painting, I do not remember whether it’s been bitten or not, there’s a goblet on the table, slightly to the left of the painting. Looks like it’s made out of some precious metal, can’t remember if gold or silver, but I am leaning towards gold. you can see PART of the table and on it there is food like cheese, grapes and apples and Henry is wearing brown and his white leopard print thing and the beret style hat. The background was either washed out green or blue. (it’s been a long time and the memory isn’t as fresh in my mind). I had no idea this was not the case and there is no such painting until now. I just found out about this today and it’s kind of a relief as this happens to me on a daily basis and I always thought it was just bad memory.

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  34. Not only was it in my textbook in school, I actually did an art project where we COPIED it using YARN in our ART CLASS. It was definitely a leg of meat and a goblet. I will see if my parents still have the pathetic attempt I gave it as I visit over the holidays!

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